Science

Scientists Discover Gut Bacteria That Improve Bee Memory

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An international research team has discovered certain types of gut bacteria in honeybees that can improve memory.


The study, led by scientists at Gangnam University in China in collaboration with researchers at Queen Mary University in London and the University of Oulu in Finland, is related to an enriched gut microbiota species known as lactobacillus apis. Showed that memory With a bumblebee.

Researchers have shown that bumblebees, which are high in this type of bacteria in the intestine, have better memory than individuals with low bacteria. We also found that bumblebees that ate foods high in this type of intestinal bacteria had longer memory lasts than those who ate a normal diet.

To test the memory and learning abilities of honeybees, researchers created artificial flowers of different colors. Five colors were associated with a sweet sucrose solution, and the other five were associated with a bitter solution containing the bee repellent quinine. Next, the researchers observed how quickly the bees were able to find out which color was associated with sugar rewards, and whether they were able to retain this information in a follow-up test three days later.By sequencing bee intestinal samples, they were able to compare Individual differences Investigate the levels of various bacteria found in the intestine in the learning and memory abilities of bumblebees.

To confirm that the number of Lactobacillus apis in the gut is directly involved in the observed memory differences, researchers added these bacteria to the bumblebee diet and measured their response to the same task. bottom.

Studies published in the journal Nature CommunicationsAdd to that increase in evidence Gut microbiota— Trillions of microbes that live in our gut — can affect animal behavior.

Bees Cognitive ability The relatively small community of gut microbiota, which varies from individual to individual, makes it an ideal model for investigating the role of specific gut microbiota in cognitive differences between individuals.

Researchers suggest that the microbiome variability observed between individual bumblebees may result from differences or changes in nest environment, activity, pathogens, social interactions, and pollination environments. ..

Dr. Li Li, the lead author of the study and a postdoctoral fellow at Gangnam University, said: Causal relationship— Adding the same bacterial species to the bee diet can enhance their memory. “

“Further research is needed to determine which bacterial species can have the same effect on humans, but our research is Bright light About this possibility “

Professor Lars Chitka of Queen Mary University of London and the co-author of this study said, “This is a fascinating discovery that may apply to humans as well as bees. Our findings are intestinal and brain. Increasing evidence of the importance of interaction, providing insight into the causes of natural cognitive differences in animals Bumblebee population. “

Professor Wei Zhao, the corresponding author and head of the Enzymology Laboratory at Gangnam University, said: Bacteria Race. This result further supports our belief that cognitive performance can be improved through the regulation of the gut microbiota. ”


Rising temperatures overcook bumblebee brunch


For more information:
The gut microbiota promotes individual memory changes in bumblebees. Nature Communications (2021). DOI: 10.1038 / s41467-021-26833-4

Quote: Scientists, bees obtained on November 25, 2021 from https: //phys.org/news/2021-11-scientists-gut-bacteria-memory-bees.html (November 25, 2021) Found intestinal bacteria that improve memory of

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https://phys.org/news/2021-11-scientists-gut-bacteria-memory-bees.html Scientists Discover Gut Bacteria That Improve Bee Memory

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