Electronics

New triboelectric fabric generates charge from body movements – Electronics World

Researchers at the University of Fukui in Japan and Nanjing University in China have developed an all-fiber composite triboelectric nanogenerator (AF-TENG) that can be easily integrated into fabrics. TENG Generate electricity from your body The movement to charge electronic devices such as mobile phones and wearables. TENG exists and is primarily used in low power devices such as LEDs and calculators, but is less often used in wearables as it is considered inadequately “breathable” and uncomfortable to wear. The new multi-layer TENG is made of silver nanowires with electrospinned fiber and polystyrene charge storage layers, ensuring high electrical performance and wear resistance.

“In our work, we Offering a new perspective on wearable energy harvesters and smart textiles“The corresponding author of the study, Dr. Hiroaki Sakamoto, said.

The triboelectric effect is a phenomenon in which two different materials are charged when they come into contact with each other and then separate. TENG uses this effect to convert mechanical movements into electrical energy. As it is intended for wearables, the emphasis is on the characteristics of TENG’s fabrics (such as material comfort) and the ability to carry charges. Triboelectric materials must be safe, biocompatible with the human body, flexible and breathable, and able to maintain high electrical output. Among the materials considered for them are electrospinned fibers because they are lightweight, durable and have excellent electrical properties.

Electrospinning is a technique that uses an electric charge to draw a solution of a polymer into a fiber. There is ongoing effort to add metal to electrospinned fibers to improve electrostatic potential and charge trapping capabilities.

Researchers at the University of Fukui in Japan and Nanjing University in China have developed an all-fiber composite triboelectric nanogenerator (AF-TENG) that can be easily integrated into fabrics. TENG generates electricity from body movements to charge electronic devices such as mobile phones and wearables. TENG exists and is primarily used in low power devices such as LEDs and calculators, but is less often used in wearables as it is considered inadequately “breathable” and uncomfortable to wear. The new multi-layer TENG is made of silver nanowires with electrospinned fiber and polystyrene charge storage layers, ensuring high electrical performance and wear resistance.

“Our work aims to provide a new perspective on wearable energy harvesters and smart textiles,” said Dr. Hiroaki Sakamoto, the research’s responding author.
The triboelectric effect is a phenomenon in which two different materials are charged when they come into contact with each other and then separate. TENG uses this effect to convert mechanical movements into electrical energy. As it is intended for wearables, the emphasis is on the characteristics of TENG’s fabrics (such as material comfort) and the ability to carry charges. Triboelectric materials must be safe, biocompatible with the human body, flexible and breathable, and able to maintain high electrical output. Among the materials considered for them are electrospinned fibers because they are lightweight, durable and have excellent electrical properties.
Electrospinning is a technique that uses an electric charge to draw a solution of a polymer into a fiber. There is ongoing effort to add metal to electrospinned fibers to improve electrostatic potential and charge trapping capabilities.
AF-TENG contains a triboelectric film made of two layers of electrospinning fibers. One is a material called polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and the other is nylon. Silver nanowires cover these layers. In addition, researchers have added a layer of electrospinned polystyrene fibers between the silver nanowires and the triboelectric film to retain charge.
The triboelectric layer acquires electric charge due to the mechanical movement of the body while walking or running. Normally, the charge buildup on the triboelectric surface is gradually lost or dissipated, degrading the surface charge density and the output performance of the nanogenerator. However, in this case, the added polystyrene film collects and traps the charge and retains the surface charge density of AF-TENG.
Researchers have used AF-TENG to light 126 commercial LEDs, each rated at 0.06 W, demonstrating the commercial feasibility of nanogenerators.

The triboelectric layer acquires electric charge due to the mechanical movement of the body while walking or running. Normally, the charge buildup on the triboelectric surface is gradually lost or dissipated, degrading the surface charge density and the output performance of the nanogenerator. However, in this case, the added polystyrene film collects and traps the charge and retains the surface charge density of AF-TENG.

Researchers have used AF-TENG to light 126 commercial LEDs, each rated at 0.06 W, demonstrating the commercial feasibility of nanogenerators.

https://www.electronicsworld.co.uk/new-triboelectric-fabric-generates-charge-from-body-movement/34115/ New triboelectric fabric generates charge from body movements – Electronics World

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